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Posts tagged as “permutation”

花花酱 LeetCode 1879. Minimum XOR Sum of Two Arrays

You are given two integer arrays nums1 and nums2 of length n.

The XOR sum of the two integer arrays is (nums1[0] XOR nums2[0]) + (nums1[1] XOR nums2[1]) + ... + (nums1[n - 1] XOR nums2[n - 1]) (0-indexed).

  • For example, the XOR sum of [1,2,3] and [3,2,1] is equal to (1 XOR 3) + (2 XOR 2) + (3 XOR 1) = 2 + 0 + 2 = 4.

Rearrange the elements of nums2 such that the resulting XOR sum is minimized.

Return the XOR sum after the rearrangement.

Example 1:

Input: nums1 = [1,2], nums2 = [2,3]
Output: 2
Explanation: Rearrange nums2 so that it becomes [3,2].
The XOR sum is (1 XOR 3) + (2 XOR 2) = 2 + 0 = 2.

Example 2:

Input: nums1 = [1,0,3], nums2 = [5,3,4]
Output: 8
Explanation: Rearrange nums2 so that it becomes [5,4,3]. 
The XOR sum is (1 XOR 5) + (0 XOR 4) + (3 XOR 3) = 4 + 4 + 0 = 8.

Constraints:

  • n == nums1.length
  • n == nums2.length
  • 1 <= n <= 14
  • 0 <= nums1[i], nums2[i] <= 107

Solution: DP / Permutation to combination

dp[s] := min xor sum by using a subset of nums2 (presented by a binary string s) xor with nums1[0:|s|].

Time complexity: O(n*2n)
Space complexity: O(2n)

C++

花花酱 LeetCode 1850. Minimum Adjacent Swaps to Reach the Kth Smallest Number

You are given a string num, representing a large integer, and an integer k.

We call some integer wonderful if it is a permutation of the digits in num and is greater in value than num. There can be many wonderful integers. However, we only care about the smallest-valued ones.

  • For example, when num = "5489355142":
    • The 1st smallest wonderful integer is "5489355214".
    • The 2nd smallest wonderful integer is "5489355241".
    • The 3rd smallest wonderful integer is "5489355412".
    • The 4th smallest wonderful integer is "5489355421".

Return the minimum number of adjacent digit swaps that needs to be applied to num to reach the kth smallest wonderful integer.

The tests are generated in such a way that kth smallest wonderful integer exists.

Example 1:

Input: num = "5489355142", k = 4
Output: 2
Explanation: The 4th smallest wonderful number is "5489355421". To get this number:
- Swap index 7 with index 8: "5489355142" -> "5489355412"
- Swap index 8 with index 9: "5489355412" -> "5489355421"

Example 2:

Input: num = "11112", k = 4
Output: 4
Explanation: The 4th smallest wonderful number is "21111". To get this number:
- Swap index 3 with index 4: "11112" -> "11121"
- Swap index 2 with index 3: "11121" -> "11211"
- Swap index 1 with index 2: "11211" -> "12111"
- Swap index 0 with index 1: "12111" -> "21111"

Example 3:

Input: num = "00123", k = 1
Output: 1
Explanation: The 1st smallest wonderful number is "00132". To get this number:
- Swap index 3 with index 4: "00123" -> "00132"

Constraints:

  • 2 <= num.length <= 1000
  • 1 <= k <= 1000
  • num only consists of digits.

Solution: Next Permutation + Greedy

Time complexity: O(k*n + n^2)
Space complexity: O(n)

C++

花花酱 LeetCode 1830. Minimum Number of Operations to Make String Sorted

You are given a string s (0-indexed)​​​​​​. You are asked to perform the following operation on s​​​​​​ until you get a sorted string:

  1. Find the largest index i such that 1 <= i < s.length and s[i] < s[i - 1].
  2. Find the largest index j such that i <= j < s.length and s[k] < s[i - 1] for all the possible values of k in the range [i, j] inclusive.
  3. Swap the two characters at indices i - 1​​​​ and j​​​​​.
  4. Reverse the suffix starting at index i​​​​​​.

Return the number of operations needed to make the string sorted. Since the answer can be too large, return it modulo 109 + 7.

Example 1:

Input: s = "cba"
Output: 5
Explanation: The simulation goes as follows:
Operation 1: i=2, j=2. Swap s[1] and s[2] to get s="cab", then reverse the suffix starting at 2. Now, s="cab".
Operation 2: i=1, j=2. Swap s[0] and s[2] to get s="bac", then reverse the suffix starting at 1. Now, s="bca".
Operation 3: i=2, j=2. Swap s[1] and s[2] to get s="bac", then reverse the suffix starting at 2. Now, s="bac".
Operation 4: i=1, j=1. Swap s[0] and s[1] to get s="abc", then reverse the suffix starting at 1. Now, s="acb".
Operation 5: i=2, j=2. Swap s[1] and s[2] to get s="abc", then reverse the suffix starting at 2. Now, s="abc".

Example 2:

Input: s = "aabaa"
Output: 2
Explanation: The simulation goes as follows:
Operation 1: i=3, j=4. Swap s[2] and s[4] to get s="aaaab", then reverse the substring starting at 3. Now, s="aaaba".
Operation 2: i=4, j=4. Swap s[3] and s[4] to get s="aaaab", then reverse the substring starting at 4. Now, s="aaaab".

Example 3:

Input: s = "cdbea"
Output: 63

Example 4:

Input: s = "leetcodeleetcodeleetcode"
Output: 982157772

Constraints:

  • 1 <= s.length <= 3000
  • s​​​​​​ consists only of lowercase English letters.

Solution: Math

Time complexity: O(26n)
Space complexity: O(n)

C++

花花酱 LeetCode 1815. Maximum Number of Groups Getting Fresh Donuts

There is a donuts shop that bakes donuts in batches of batchSize. They have a rule where they must serve all of the donuts of a batch before serving any donuts of the next batch. You are given an integer batchSize and an integer array groups, where groups[i] denotes that there is a group of groups[i] customers that will visit the shop. Each customer will get exactly one donut.

When a group visits the shop, all customers of the group must be served before serving any of the following groups. A group will be happy if they all get fresh donuts. That is, the first customer of the group does not receive a donut that was left over from the previous group.

You can freely rearrange the ordering of the groups. Return the maximum possible number of happy groups after rearranging the groups.

Example 1:

Input: batchSize = 3, groups = [1,2,3,4,5,6]
Output: 4
Explanation: You can arrange the groups as [6,2,4,5,1,3]. Then the 1st, 2nd, 4th, and 6th groups will be happy.

Example 2:

Input: batchSize = 4, groups = [1,3,2,5,2,2,1,6]
Output: 4

Constraints:

  • 1 <= batchSize <= 9
  • 1 <= groups.length <= 30
  • 1 <= groups[i] <= 109

Solution 0: Binary Mask DP

Time complexity: O(n*2n) TLE
Space complexity: O(2n)

C++

Solution 1: Recursion w/ Memoization

State: count of group size % batchSize

C++

C++/Hashtable

C++/OPT

花花酱 LeetCode 1806. Minimum Number of Operations to Reinitialize a Permutation

You are given an even integer n​​​​​​. You initially have a permutation perm of size n​​ where perm[i] == i​ (0-indexed)​​​​.

In one operation, you will create a new array arr, and for each i:

  • If i % 2 == 0, then arr[i] = perm[i / 2].
  • If i % 2 == 1, then arr[i] = perm[n / 2 + (i - 1) / 2].

You will then assign arr​​​​ to perm.

Return the minimum non-zero number of operations you need to perform on perm to return the permutation to its initial value.

Example 1:

Input: n = 2
Output: 1
Explanation: prem = [0,1] initially.
After the 1st operation, prem = [0,1]
So it takes only 1 operation.

Example 2:

Input: n = 4
Output: 2
Explanation: prem = [0,1,2,3] initially.
After the 1st operation, prem = [0,2,1,3]
After the 2nd operation, prem = [0,1,2,3]
So it takes only 2 operations.

Example 3:

Input: n = 6
Output: 4

Constraints:

  • 2 <= n <= 1000
  • n​​​​​​ is even.

Solution: Brute Force / Simulation

Time complexity: O(n2) ?
Space complexity: O(n)

C++