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Posts published in “Geometry”

花花酱 LeetCode 1895. Largest Magic Square

k x k magic square is a k x k grid filled with integers such that every row sum, every column sum, and both diagonal sums are all equal. The integers in the magic square do not have to be distinct. Every 1 x 1 grid is trivially a magic square.

Given an m x n integer grid, return the size (i.e., the side length k) of the largest magic square that can be found within this grid.

Example 1:

Input: grid = [[7,1,4,5,6],[2,5,1,6,4],[1,5,4,3,2],[1,2,7,3,4]]
Output: 3
Explanation: The largest magic square has a size of 3.
Every row sum, column sum, and diagonal sum of this magic square is equal to 12.
- Row sums: 5+1+6 = 5+4+3 = 2+7+3 = 12
- Column sums: 5+5+2 = 1+4+7 = 6+3+3 = 12
- Diagonal sums: 5+4+3 = 6+4+2 = 12

Example 2:

Input: grid = [[5,1,3,1],[9,3,3,1],[1,3,3,8]]
Output: 2

Constraints:

  • m == grid.length
  • n == grid[i].length
  • 1 <= m, n <= 50
  • 1 <= grid[i][j] <= 106

Solution: Brute Force w/ Prefix Sum

Compute the prefix sum for each row and each column.

And check all possible squares.

Time complexity: O(m*n*min(m,n)2)
Space complexity: O(m*n)

C++

花花酱 LeetCode 1878. Get Biggest Three Rhombus Sums in a Grid

You are given an m x n integer matrix grid​​​.

rhombus sum is the sum of the elements that form the border of a regular rhombus shape in grid​​​. The rhombus must have the shape of a square rotated 45 degrees with each of the corners centered in a grid cell. Below is an image of four valid rhombus shapes with the corresponding colored cells that should be included in each rhombus sum:

Note that the rhombus can have an area of 0, which is depicted by the purple rhombus in the bottom right corner.

Return the biggest three distinct rhombus sums in the grid in descending order. If there are less than three distinct values, return all of them.

Example 1:

Input: grid = [[3,4,5,1,3],[3,3,4,2,3],[20,30,200,40,10],[1,5,5,4,1],[4,3,2,2,5]]
Output: [228,216,211]
Explanation: The rhombus shapes for the three biggest distinct rhombus sums are depicted above.
- Blue: 20 + 3 + 200 + 5 = 228
- Red: 200 + 2 + 10 + 4 = 216
- Green: 5 + 200 + 4 + 2 = 211

Example 2:

Input: grid = [[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9]]
Output: [20,9,8]
Explanation: The rhombus shapes for the three biggest distinct rhombus sums are depicted above.
- Blue: 4 + 2 + 6 + 8 = 20
- Red: 9 (area 0 rhombus in the bottom right corner)
- Green: 8 (area 0 rhombus in the bottom middle)

Example 3:

Input: grid = [[7,7,7]]
Output: [7]
Explanation: All three possible rhombus sums are the same, so return [7].

Constraints:

  • m == grid.length
  • n == grid[i].length
  • 1 <= m, n <= 50
  • 1 <= grid[i][j] <= 105

Solution: Brute Force

Just find all Rhombus…

Time complexity: O(mn*min(n,m)2)
Space complexity: O(mn*min(n,m)2)

C++

花花酱 LeetCode 1828. Queries on Number of Points Inside a Circle

You are given an array points where points[i] = [xi, yi] is the coordinates of the ith point on a 2D plane. Multiple points can have the same coordinates.

You are also given an array queries where queries[j] = [xj, yj, rj] describes a circle centered at (xj, yj) with a radius of rj.

For each query queries[j], compute the number of points inside the jth circle. Points on the border of the circle are considered inside.

Return an array answer, where answer[j] is the answer to the jth query.

Example 1:

Input: points = [[1,3],[3,3],[5,3],[2,2]], queries = [[2,3,1],[4,3,1],[1,1,2]]
Output: [3,2,2]
Explanation: The points and circles are shown above.
queries[0] is the green circle, queries[1] is the red circle, and queries[2] is the blue circle.

Example 2:

Input: points = [[1,1],[2,2],[3,3],[4,4],[5,5]], queries = [[1,2,2],[2,2,2],[4,3,2],[4,3,3]]
Output: [2,3,2,4]
Explanation: The points and circles are shown above.
queries[0] is green, queries[1] is red, queries[2] is blue, and queries[3] is purple.

Constraints:

  • 1 <= points.length <= 500
  • points[i].length == 2
  • 0 <= x​​​​​​i, y​​​​​​i <= 500
  • 1 <= queries.length <= 500
  • queries[j].length == 3
  • 0 <= xj, yj <= 500
  • 1 <= rj <= 500
  • All coordinates are integers.

Solution: Brute Force

Time complexity: O(P * Q)
Space complexity: O(1)

C++

花花酱 LeetCode 1779. Find Nearest Point That Has the Same X or Y Coordinate

You are given two integers, x and y, which represent your current location on a Cartesian grid: (x, y). You are also given an array points where each points[i] = [ai, bi] represents that a point exists at (ai, bi). A point is valid if it shares the same x-coordinate or the same y-coordinate as your location.

Return the index (0-indexed) of the valid point with the smallest Manhattan distance from your current location. If there are multiple, return the valid point with the smallest index. If there are no valid points, return -1.

The Manhattan distance between two points (x1, y1) and (x2, y2) is abs(x1 - x2) + abs(y1 - y2).

Example 1:

Input: x = 3, y = 4, points = [[1,2],[3,1],[2,4],[2,3],[4,4]]
Output: 2
Explanation: Of all the points, only [3,1], [2,4] and [4,4] are valid. Of the valid points, [2,4] and [4,4] have the smallest Manhattan distance from your current location, with a distance of 1. [2,4] has the smallest index, so return 2.

Example 2:

Input: x = 3, y = 4, points = [[3,4]]
Output: 0
Explanation: The answer is allowed to be on the same location as your current location.

Example 3:

Input: x = 3, y = 4, points = [[2,3]]
Output: -1
Explanation: There are no valid points.

Constraints:

  • 1 <= points.length <= 104
  • points[i].length == 2
  • 1 <= x, y, ai, bi <= 104

Solution: Brute Force

Time complexity: O(n)
Space complexity: O(1)

C++

花花酱 LeetCode 1739. Building Boxes

You have a cubic storeroom where the width, length, and height of the room are all equal to n units. You are asked to place n boxes in this room where each box is a cube of unit side length. There are however some rules to placing the boxes:

  • You can place the boxes anywhere on the floor.
  • If box x is placed on top of the box y, then each side of the four vertical sides of the box y must either be adjacent to another box or to a wall.

Given an integer n, return the minimum possible number of boxes touching the floor.

Example 1:

Input: n = 3
Output: 3
Explanation: The figure above is for the placement of the three boxes.
These boxes are placed in the corner of the room, where the corner is on the left side.

Example 2:

Input: n = 4
Output: 3
Explanation: The figure above is for the placement of the four boxes.
These boxes are placed in the corner of the room, where the corner is on the left side.

Example 3:

Input: n = 10
Output: 6
Explanation: The figure above is for the placement of the ten boxes.
These boxes are placed in the corner of the room, where the corner is on the back side.

Constraints:

  • 1 <= n <= 109

Solution: Geometry

Step 1: Build a largest pyramid that has less then n cubes, whose base area is d*(d+1) / 2
Step 2: Build a largest triangle with cubes left, whose base area is l, l*(l + 1) / 2 >= left

Time complexity: O(n^(1/3))
Space complexity: O(1)

C++