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Posts tagged as “graph”

花花酱 LeetCode 1377. Frog Position After T Seconds

Given an undirected tree consisting of n vertices numbered from 1 to n. A frog starts jumping from the vertex 1. In one second, the frog jumps from its current vertex to another unvisited vertex if they are directly connected. The frog can not jump back to a visited vertex. In case the frog can jump to several vertices it jumps randomly to one of them with the same probability, otherwise, when the frog can not jump to any unvisited vertex it jumps forever on the same vertex. 

The edges of the undirected tree are given in the array edges, where edges[i] = [fromi, toi] means that exists an edge connecting directly the vertices fromi and toi.

Return the probability that after t seconds the frog is on the vertex target.

Example 1:

Input: n = 7, edges = [[1,2],[1,3],[1,7],[2,4],[2,6],[3,5]], t = 2, target = 4
Output: 0.16666666666666666 
Explanation: The figure above shows the given graph. The frog starts at vertex 1, jumping with 1/3 probability to the vertex 2 after second 1 and then jumping with 1/2 probability to vertex 4 after second 2. Thus the probability for the frog is on the vertex 4 after 2 seconds is 1/3 * 1/2 = 1/6 = 0.16666666666666666. 

Example 2:

Input: n = 7, edges = [[1,2],[1,3],[1,7],[2,4],[2,6],[3,5]], t = 1, target = 7
Output: 0.3333333333333333
Explanation: The figure above shows the given graph. The frog starts at vertex 1, jumping with 1/3 = 0.3333333333333333 probability to the vertex 7 after second 1. 

Example 3:

Input: n = 7, edges = [[1,2],[1,3],[1,7],[2,4],[2,6],[3,5]], t = 20, target = 6
Output: 0.16666666666666666

Constraints:

  • 1 <= n <= 100
  • edges.length == n-1
  • edges[i].length == 2
  • 1 <= edges[i][0], edges[i][1] <= n
  • 1 <= t <= 50
  • 1 <= target <= n
  • Answers within 10^-5 of the actual value will be accepted as correct.

Solution: BFS

key: if a node has children, the fog jumps to to children so the probability at current node will become 0.

Time complexity: O(n)
Space complexity: O(n)

C++

python3

花花酱 LeetCode 721. Accounts Merge

Given a list accounts, each element accounts[i] is a list of strings, where the first element accounts[i][0] is a name, and the rest of the elements are emails representing emails of the account.

Now, we would like to merge these accounts. Two accounts definitely belong to the same person if there is some email that is common to both accounts. Note that even if two accounts have the same name, they may belong to different people as people could have the same name. A person can have any number of accounts initially, but all of their accounts definitely have the same name.

After merging the accounts, return the accounts in the following format: the first element of each account is the name, and the rest of the elements are emails in sorted order. The accounts themselves can be returned in any order.

Example 1:

Input: 
accounts = [["John", "johnsmith@mail.com", "john00@mail.com"], ["John", "johnnybravo@mail.com"], ["John", "johnsmith@mail.com", "john_newyork@mail.com"], ["Mary", "mary@mail.com"]]
Output: [["John", 'john00@mail.com', 'john_newyork@mail.com', 'johnsmith@mail.com'],  ["John", "johnnybravo@mail.com"], ["Mary", "mary@mail.com"]]
Explanation: 
The first and third John's are the same person as they have the common email "johnsmith@mail.com".
The second John and Mary are different people as none of their email addresses are used by other accounts.
We could return these lists in any order, for example the answer [['Mary', 'mary@mail.com'], ['John', 'johnnybravo@mail.com'], 
['John', 'john00@mail.com', 'john_newyork@mail.com', 'johnsmith@mail.com']] would still be accepted.

Note:The length of accounts will be in the range [1, 1000].The length of accounts[i] will be in the range [1, 10].The length of accounts[i][j] will be in the range [1, 30].

Solution: Union-Find

C++

花花酱 LeetCode 138. Copy List with Random Pointer

A linked list is given such that each node contains an additional random pointer which could point to any node in the list or null.

Return a deep copy of the list.

The Linked List is represented in the input/output as a list of n nodes. Each node is represented as a pair of [val, random_index] where:

  • val: an integer representing Node.val
  • random_index: the index of the node (range from 0 to n-1) where random pointer points to, or null if it does not point to any node.

Example 1:

Input: head = [[7,null],[13,0],[11,4],[10,2],[1,0]]
Output: [[7,null],[13,0],[11,4],[10,2],[1,0]]

Example 2:

Input: head = [[1,1],[2,1]]
Output: [[1,1],[2,1]]

Example 3:

Input: head = [[3,null],[3,0],[3,null]]
Output: [[3,null],[3,0],[3,null]]

Example 4:

Input: head = []
Output: []
Explanation: Given linked list is empty (null pointer), so return null.

Constraints:

  • -10000 <= Node.val <= 10000
  • Node.random is null or pointing to a node in the linked list.
  • Number of Nodes will not exceed 1000.

Solution: Hashtable

Time complexity: O(n)
Space complexity: O(n)

C++

花花酱 LeetCode 1334. Find the City With the Smallest Number of Neighbors at a Threshold Distance

There are n cities numbered from 0 to n-1. Given the array edges where edges[i] = [fromi, toi, weighti] represents a bidirectional and weighted edge between cities fromi and toi, and given the integer distanceThreshold.

Return the city with the smallest numberof cities that are reachable through some path and whose distance is at most distanceThreshold, If there are multiple such cities, return the city with the greatest number.

Notice that the distance of a path connecting cities i and j is equal to the sum of the edges’ weights along that path.

Example 1:

Input: n = 4, edges = [[0,1,3],[1,2,1],[1,3,4],[2,3,1]], distanceThreshold = 4
Output: 3
Explanation: The figure above describes the graph. 
The neighboring cities at a distanceThreshold = 4 for each city are:
City 0 -> [City 1, City 2] 
City 1 -> [City 0, City 2, City 3] 
City 2 -> [City 0, City 1, City 3] 
City 3 -> [City 1, City 2] 
Cities 0 and 3 have 2 neighboring cities at a distanceThreshold = 4, but we have to return city 3 since it has the greatest number.

Example 2:

Input: n = 5, edges = [[0,1,2],[0,4,8],[1,2,3],[1,4,2],[2,3,1],[3,4,1]], distanceThreshold = 2
Output: 0
Explanation: The figure above describes the graph. 
The neighboring cities at a distanceThreshold = 2 for each city are:
City 0 -> [City 1] 
City 1 -> [City 0, City 4] 
City 2 -> [City 3, City 4] 
City 3 -> [City 2, City 4]
City 4 -> [City 1, City 2, City 3] 
The city 0 has 1 neighboring city at a distanceThreshold = 2.

Constraints:

  • 2 <= n <= 100
  • 1 <= edges.length <= n * (n - 1) / 2
  • edges[i].length == 3
  • 0 <= fromi < toi < n
  • 1 <= weighti, distanceThreshold <= 10^4
  • All pairs (fromi, toi) are distinct.

Solution1: Floyd-Warshall

All pair shortest path

Time complexity: O(n^3)
Space complexity: O(n^2)

C++

Solution 2: Dijkstra’s Algorithm

Time complexity: O(V * ElogV) / worst O(n^3*logn), best O(n^2*logn)
Space complexity: O(V + E)

C++

花花酱 Minimum Spanning Tree (MST) 最小生成树 SP18

Prim’s Algorithm

Time complexity: O(ElogV)
Space complexity: O(V+E)

C++

Python

Kruskal’s Algorithm

Time complexity: O(ElogV)
Space complexity: O(V+E)

C++

Python