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花花酱 LeetCode 2231. Largest Number After Digit Swaps by Parity

You are given a positive integer num. You may swap any two digits of num that have the same parity (i.e. both odd digits or both even digits).

Return the largest possible value of num after any number of swaps.

Example 1:

Input: num = 1234
Output: 3412
Explanation: Swap the digit 3 with the digit 1, this results in the number 3214.
Swap the digit 2 with the digit 4, this results in the number 3412.
Note that there may be other sequences of swaps but it can be shown that 3412 is the largest possible number.
Also note that we may not swap the digit 4 with the digit 1 since they are of different parities.

Example 2:

Input: num = 65875
Output: 87655
Explanation: Swap the digit 8 with the digit 6, this results in the number 85675.
Swap the first digit 5 with the digit 7, this results in the number 87655.
Note that there may be other sequences of swaps but it can be shown that 87655 is the largest possible number.

Constraints:

  • 1 <= num <= 109

Solution:

Put all even digits into one array, all odd digits into another one, all digits into the third. Sort two arrays, and generate a new number from sorted arrays.

Time complexity: O(logn*loglogn)
Space complexity: O(logn)

C++

花花酱 LeetCode 2195. Append K Integers With Minimal Sum

You are given an integer array nums and an integer k. Append k unique positive integers that do not appear in nums to nums such that the resulting total sum is minimum.

Return the sum of the k integers appended to nums.

Example 1:

Input: nums = [1,4,25,10,25], k = 2
Output: 5
Explanation: The two unique positive integers that do not appear in nums which we append are 2 and 3.
The resulting sum of nums is 1 + 4 + 25 + 10 + 25 + 2 + 3 = 70, which is the minimum.
The sum of the two integers appended is 2 + 3 = 5, so we return 5.

Example 2:

Input: nums = [5,6], k = 6
Output: 25
Explanation: The six unique positive integers that do not appear in nums which we append are 1, 2, 3, 4, 7, and 8.
The resulting sum of nums is 5 + 6 + 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 7 + 8 = 36, which is the minimum. 
The sum of the six integers appended is 1 + 2 + 3 + 4 + 7 + 8 = 25, so we return 25.

Constraints:

  • 1 <= nums.length <= 105
  • 1 <= nums[i] <= 109
  • 1 <= k <= 108

Solution: Greedy + Math, fill the gap

Sort all the numbers and remove duplicated ones, and fill the gap between two neighboring numbers.
e.g. [15, 3, 8, 8] => sorted = [3, 8, 15]
fill 0->3, 1,2, sum = ((0 + 1) + (3-1)) * (3-0-1) / 2 = 3
fill 3->8, 4, 5, 6, 7, sum = ((3 + 1) + (8-1)) * (8-3-1) / 2 = 22
fill 8->15, 9, 10, …, 14, …
fill 15->inf, 16, 17, …

Time complexity: O(nlogn)
Space complexity: O(1)

C++

花花酱 LeetCode 2146. K Highest Ranked Items Within a Price Range

You are given a 0-indexed 2D integer array grid of size m x n that represents a map of the items in a shop. The integers in the grid represent the following:

  • 0 represents a wall that you cannot pass through.
  • 1 represents an empty cell that you can freely move to and from.
  • All other positive integers represent the price of an item in that cell. You may also freely move to and from these item cells.

It takes 1 step to travel between adjacent grid cells.

You are also given integer arrays pricing and start where pricing = [low, high] and start = [row, col] indicates that you start at the position (row, col) and are interested only in items with a price in the range of [low, high] (inclusive). You are further given an integer k.

You are interested in the positions of the k highest-ranked items whose prices are within the given price range. The rank is determined by the first of these criteria that is different:

  1. Distance, defined as the length of the shortest path from the start (shorter distance has a higher rank).
  2. Price (lower price has a higher rank, but it must be in the price range).
  3. The row number (smaller row number has a higher rank).
  4. The column number (smaller column number has a higher rank).

Return the k highest-ranked items within the price range sorted by their rank (highest to lowest). If there are fewer than k reachable items within the price range, return all of them.

Example 1:

Input: grid = [[1,2,0,1],[1,3,0,1],[0,2,5,1]], pricing = [2,5], start = [0,0], k = 3
Output: [[0,1],[1,1],[2,1]]
Explanation: You start at (0,0).
With a price range of [2,5], we can take items from (0,1), (1,1), (2,1) and (2,2).
The ranks of these items are:
- (0,1) with distance 1
- (1,1) with distance 2
- (2,1) with distance 3
- (2,2) with distance 4
Thus, the 3 highest ranked items in the price range are (0,1), (1,1), and (2,1).

Example 2:

Input: grid = [[1,2,0,1],[1,3,3,1],[0,2,5,1]], pricing = [2,3], start = [2,3], k = 2
Output: [[2,1],[1,2]]
Explanation: You start at (2,3).
With a price range of [2,3], we can take items from (0,1), (1,1), (1,2) and (2,1).
The ranks of these items are:
- (2,1) with distance 2, price 2
- (1,2) with distance 2, price 3
- (1,1) with distance 3
- (0,1) with distance 4
Thus, the 2 highest ranked items in the price range are (2,1) and (1,2).

Example 3:

Input: grid = [[1,1,1],[0,0,1],[2,3,4]], pricing = [2,3], start = [0,0], k = 3
Output: [[2,1],[2,0]]
Explanation: You start at (0,0).
With a price range of [2,3], we can take items from (2,0) and (2,1). 
The ranks of these items are: 
- (2,1) with distance 5
- (2,0) with distance 6
Thus, the 2 highest ranked items in the price range are (2,1) and (2,0). 
Note that k = 3 but there are only 2 reachable items within the price range.

Constraints:

  • m == grid.length
  • n == grid[i].length
  • 1 <= m, n <= 105
  • 1 <= m * n <= 105
  • 0 <= grid[i][j] <= 105
  • pricing.length == 2
  • 2 <= low <= high <= 105
  • start.length == 2
  • 0 <= row <= m - 1
  • 0 <= col <= n - 1
  • grid[row][col] > 0
  • 1 <= k <= m * n

Solution: BFS + Sorting

Use BFS to collect reachable cells and sort afterwards.

Time complexity: O(mn + KlogK) where K = # of reachable cells.

Space complexity: O(mn)

C++

花花酱 LeetCode 1942. The Number of the Smallest Unoccupied Chair

There is a party where n friends numbered from 0 to n - 1 are attending. There is an infinite number of chairs in this party that are numbered from 0 to infinity. When a friend arrives at the party, they sit on the unoccupied chair with the smallest number.

  • For example, if chairs 01, and 5 are occupied when a friend comes, they will sit on chair number 2.

When a friend leaves the party, their chair becomes unoccupied at the moment they leave. If another friend arrives at that same moment, they can sit in that chair.

You are given a 0-indexed 2D integer array times where times[i] = [arrivali, leavingi], indicating the arrival and leaving times of the ith friend respectively, and an integer targetFriend. All arrival times are distinct.

Return the chair number that the friend numbered targetFriend will sit on.

Example 1:

Input: times = [[1,4],[2,3],[4,6]], targetFriend = 1
Output: 1
Explanation: 
- Friend 0 arrives at time 1 and sits on chair 0.
- Friend 1 arrives at time 2 and sits on chair 1.
- Friend 1 leaves at time 3 and chair 1 becomes empty.
- Friend 0 leaves at time 4 and chair 0 becomes empty.
- Friend 2 arrives at time 4 and sits on chair 0.
Since friend 1 sat on chair 1, we return 1.

Example 2:

Input: times = [[3,10],[1,5],[2,6]], targetFriend = 0
Output: 2
Explanation: 
- Friend 1 arrives at time 1 and sits on chair 0.
- Friend 2 arrives at time 2 and sits on chair 1.
- Friend 0 arrives at time 3 and sits on chair 2.
- Friend 1 leaves at time 5 and chair 0 becomes empty.
- Friend 2 leaves at time 6 and chair 1 becomes empty.
- Friend 0 leaves at time 10 and chair 2 becomes empty.
Since friend 0 sat on chair 2, we return 2.

Constraints:

  • n == times.length
  • 2 <= n <= 104
  • times[i].length == 2
  • 1 <= arrivali < leavingi <= 105
  • 0 <= targetFriend <= n - 1
  • Each arrivali time is distinct.

Solution: Treeset + Simulation

Use a treeset to track available chairs, sort events by time.
note: process leaving events first.

Time complexity: O(nlogn)
Space complexity: O(n)

C++

花花酱 LeetCode 1913. Maximum Product Difference Between Two Pairs

The product difference between two pairs (a, b) and (c, d) is defined as (a * b) - (c * d).

  • For example, the product difference between (5, 6) and (2, 7) is (5 * 6) - (2 * 7) = 16.

Given an integer array nums, choose four distinct indices wxy, and z such that the product difference between pairs (nums[w], nums[x]) and (nums[y], nums[z]) is maximized.

Return the maximum such product difference.

Example 1:

Input: nums = [5,6,2,7,4]
Output: 34
Explanation: We can choose indices 1 and 3 for the first pair (6, 7) and indices 2 and 4 for the second pair (2, 4).
The product difference is (6 * 7) - (2 * 4) = 34.

Example 2:

Input: nums = [4,2,5,9,7,4,8]
Output: 64
Explanation: We can choose indices 3 and 6 for the first pair (9, 8) and indices 1 and 5 for the second pair (2, 4).
The product difference is (9 * 8) - (2 * 4) = 64.

Constraints:

  • 4 <= nums.length <= 104
  • 1 <= nums[i] <= 104

Solution: Greedy

Since all the numbers are positive, we just need to find the largest two numbers as the first pair and smallest two numbers are the second pair.

Time complexity: O(nlogn) / sorting, O(n) / finding min/max elements.
Space complexity: O(1)

C++

Python3