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Posts tagged as “O(mn)”

花花酱 LeetCode 1391. Check if There is a Valid Path in a Grid

Given a m x ngrid. Each cell of the grid represents a street. The street of grid[i][j] can be:

  • 1 which means a street connecting the left cell and the right cell.
  • 2 which means a street connecting the upper cell and the lower cell.
  • 3 which means a street connecting the left cell and the lower cell.
  • 4 which means a street connecting the right cell and the lower cell.
  • 5 which means a street connecting the left cell and the upper cell.
  • 6 which means a street connecting the right cell and the upper cell.

You will initially start at the street of the upper-left cell (0,0). A valid path in the grid is a path which starts from the upper left cell (0,0) and ends at the bottom-right cell (m - 1, n - 1)The path should only follow the streets.

Notice that you are not allowed to change any street.

Return true if there is a valid path in the grid or false otherwise.

Example 1:

Input: grid = [[2,4,3],[6,5,2]]
Output: true
Explanation: As shown you can start at cell (0, 0) and visit all the cells of the grid to reach (m - 1, n - 1).

Example 2:

Input: grid = [[1,2,1],[1,2,1]]
Output: false
Explanation: As shown you the street at cell (0, 0) is not connected with any street of any other cell and you will get stuck at cell (0, 0)

Example 3:

Input: grid = [[1,1,2]]
Output: false
Explanation: You will get stuck at cell (0, 1) and you cannot reach cell (0, 2).

Example 4:

Input: grid = [[1,1,1,1,1,1,3]]
Output: true

Example 5:

Input: grid = [[2],[2],[2],[2],[2],[2],[6]]
Output: true

Constraints:

  • m == grid.length
  • n == grid[i].length
  • 1 <= m, n <= 300
  • 1 <= grid[i][j] <= 6

Solution: BFS

Need to check both sides (x, y) -> (tx, ty) and (tx, ty) -> (x, y) to make sure a path exist.

Time complexity: O(m*n)
Space complexity: O(m*n)

C++

花花酱 LeetCode 1380. Lucky Numbers in a Matrix

Given a m * n matrix of distinct numbers, return all lucky numbers in the matrix in any order.

A lucky number is an element of the matrix such that it is the minimum element in its row and maximum in its column.

Example 1:

Input: matrix = [[3,7,8],[9,11,13],[15,16,17]]
Output: [15]
Explanation: 15 is the only lucky number since it is the minimum in its row and the maximum in its column

Example 2:

Input: matrix = [[1,10,4,2],[9,3,8,7],[15,16,17,12]]
Output: [12]
Explanation: 12 is the only lucky number since it is the minimum in its row and the maximum in its column.

Example 3:

Input: matrix = [[7,8],[1,2]]
Output: [7]

Constraints:

  • m == mat.length
  • n == mat[i].length
  • 1 <= n, m <= 50
  • 1 <= matrix[i][j] <= 10^5.
  • All elements in the matrix are distinct.

Solution: Pre-processing

Two pass. First pass, record the min val of each row, and max val of each column.
Second pass, identify lucky numbers.

Time complexity: O(m * n)
Space complexity: O(m + n)

C++

花花酱 LeetCode 1368. Minimum Cost to Make at Least One Valid Path in a Grid

Given a m x ngrid. Each cell of the grid has a sign pointing to the next cell you should visit if you are currently in this cell. The sign of grid[i][j] can be:

  • 1 which means go to the cell to the right. (i.e go from grid[i][j] to grid[i][j + 1])
  • 2 which means go to the cell to the left. (i.e go from grid[i][j] to grid[i][j - 1])
  • 3 which means go to the lower cell. (i.e go from grid[i][j] to grid[i + 1][j])
  • 4 which means go to the upper cell. (i.e go from grid[i][j] to grid[i - 1][j])

Notice that there could be some invalid signs on the cells of the grid which points outside the grid.

You will initially start at the upper left cell (0,0). A valid path in the grid is a path which starts from the upper left cell (0,0) and ends at the bottom-right cell (m - 1, n - 1) following the signs on the grid. The valid path doesn’t have to be the shortest.

You can modify the sign on a cell with cost = 1. You can modify the sign on a cell one time only.

Return the minimum cost to make the grid have at least one valid path.

Example 1:

Input: grid = [[1,1,1,1],[2,2,2,2],[1,1,1,1],[2,2,2,2]]
Output: 3
Explanation: You will start at point (0, 0).
The path to (3, 3) is as follows. (0, 0) --> (0, 1) --> (0, 2) --> (0, 3) change the arrow to down with cost = 1 --> (1, 3) --> (1, 2) --> (1, 1) --> (1, 0) change the arrow to down with cost = 1 --> (2, 0) --> (2, 1) --> (2, 2) --> (2, 3) change the arrow to down with cost = 1 --> (3, 3)
The total cost = 3.

Example 2:

Input: grid = [[1,1,3],[3,2,2],[1,1,4]]
Output: 0
Explanation: You can follow the path from (0, 0) to (2, 2).

Example 3:

Input: grid = [[1,2],[4,3]]
Output: 1

Example 4:

Input: grid = [[2,2,2],[2,2,2]]
Output: 3

Example 5:

Input: grid = [[4]]
Output: 0

Constraints:

  • m == grid.length
  • n == grid[i].length
  • 1 <= m, n <= 100

Solution 1: Lazy BFS (fake DP)

dp[i][j] := min steps to reach (i, j)

Time complexity: O((m+n)*m*n)
Space complexity: O(m*n)

C++

C++

Solution 2: 0-1 BFS

Time complexity: O(m*n)
Space complexity: O(m*n)

C++

花花酱 LeetCode 1314. Matrix Block Sum

Given a m * n matrix mat and an integer K, return a matrix answer where each answer[i][j] is the sum of all elements mat[r][c] for i - K <= r <= i + K, j - K <= c <= j + K, and (r, c) is a valid position in the matrix.

Example 1:

Input: mat = [[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9]], K = 1
Output: [[12,21,16],[27,45,33],[24,39,28]]

Example 2:

Input: mat = [[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9]], K = 2
Output: [[45,45,45],[45,45,45],[45,45,45]]

Constraints:

  • m == mat.length
  • n == mat[i].length
  • 1 <= m, n, K <= 100
  • 1 <= mat[i][j] <= 100

Solution: 2D range query

Time complexity: O(m*n)
Space complexity: O(m*n)

C++

花花酱 LeetCode 1267. Count Servers that Communicate

You are given a map of a server center, represented as a m * n integer matrix grid, where 1 means that on that cell there is a server and 0 means that it is no server. Two servers are said to communicate if they are on the same row or on the same column.

Return the number of servers that communicate with any other server.

Example 1:

Input: grid = [[1,0],[0,1]]
Output: 0
Explanation: No servers can communicate with others.

Example 2:

Input: grid = [[1,0],[1,1]]
Output: 3
Explanation: All three servers can communicate with at least one other server.

Example 3:

Input: grid = [[1,1,0,0],[0,0,1,0],[0,0,1,0],[0,0,0,1]]
Output: 4
Explanation: The two servers in the first row can communicate with each other. The two servers in the third column can communicate with each other. The server at right bottom corner can't communicate with any other server.

Constraints:

  • m == grid.length
  • n == grid[i].length
  • 1 <= m <= 250
  • 1 <= n <= 250
  • grid[i][j] == 0 or 1

Solution: Counting

Two passes:
First pass, count number of computers for each row and each column.
Second pass, count grid[i][j] if rows[i] or cols[j] has more than 1 computer.

Time complexity: O(m*n)
Space complexity: O(m + n)

C++